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Why Open Research? Advance your career by sharing your work.

This project was born out of our passion for opening up research, making it accessible and reusable by all. We view access to information as a human right and think it should be treated as such. And we believe it will take students and researchers at all levels of academia to bring about culture change. By sharing our work, we can stimulate learning, innovation, and discovery.

Many researchers support the idea of increasing access to research, but worry about the implications for their career of sharing their work. We built this site primarily for researchers, to educate them about all the different ways they can be open and how sharing can be beneficial for their careers. We also aim to provide information and resources for those working in open advocacy. All resources herein all openly licensed and their reuse in encouraged.

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Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access

Schimmer, R., Geschuhn, K. K., & Vogler, A. (2015). Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access. doi:10.17617/1.3.

This paper makes the strong, fact-based case for a large-scale transformation of the current corpus of scientific subscription journals to an open access business model. The existing journals, with their well-tested functionalities, should be retained and developed to meet the demands of 21st century research, while the underlying payment streams undergo a major restructuring. There is sufficient momentum for this decisive push towards open access publishing. The diverse existing initiatives must be coordinated so as to converge on this clear goal. The international nature of research implies that this transformation will be achieved on a truly global scale only through a consensus of the world’s most eminent research organizations. All the indications are that the money already invested in the research publishing system is sufficient to enable a transformation that will be sustainable for the future. There needs to be a shared understanding that the money currently locked in the journal subscription system must be withdrawn and re-purposed for open access publishing services. The current library acquisition budgets are the ultimate reservoir for enabling the transformation without financial or other risks. The goal is to preserve the established service levels provided by publishers that are still requested by researchers, while redefining and reorganizing the necessary payment streams. By disrupting the underlying business model, the viability of journal publishing can be preserved and put on a solid footing for the scholarly developments of the future.

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Open Access Journal Publishing Resource Index

A variety of resources are available to guide the launch and operation of an open-access journal. To promote awareness of these resources, and to facilitate their efficient use, this section provides a high-level index to these guides by topic. Also included are links to example documents for key planning elements, such as new journal prospectuses, bylaws, sample editorial policies, and others.

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Evaluating Open Access Journals

This guide contains information and resources related to scholarly communication and publishing at Ryerson University.

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Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities

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Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing

Definition of Open Access Publication

An Open Access Publication[1] is one that meets the following two conditions:

  1. The author(s) and copyright holder(s) grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, perpetual right of access to, and a license to copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship[2], as well as the right to make small numbers of printed copies for their personal use.
  2. A complete version of the work and all supplemental materials, including a copy of the permission as stated above, in a suitable standard electronic format is deposited immediately upon initial publication in at least one online repository that is supported by an academic institution, scholarly society, government agency, or other well-established organization that seeks to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, interoperability, and long-term archiving (for the biomedical sciences, PubMed Central is such a repository).

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BOAI- The Budapest Open Access Initiative

In response to the growing demand to make research free and available to anyone with a computer and an internet connection, a diverse coalition has issued new guidelines that could usher in huge advances in the sciences, medicine, and health.

The recommendations were developed by leaders of the Open Access movement, which has worked for the past decade to provide the public with unrestricted, free access to scholarly research—much of which is publicly funded. Making the research publicly available to everyone—free of charge and without most copyright and licensing restrictions—will accelerate scientific research efforts and allow authors to reach a larger number of readers.

The recommendations are the result of a meeting organized by the Open Society Foundations to mark the tenth anniversary of Budapest Open Access Initiative, which first defined Open Access. The recommendations include the development of Open Access policies in institutions of higher education and in funding agencies, the open licensing of scholarly works, the development of infrastructure such as Open Access repositories and creating standards of professional conduct for Open Access publishing. The recommendations also establish a new goal of achieving Open Access as the default method for distributing new peer-reviewed research in every field and in every country within ten years’ time.

Translations of the recommendations have already been made in several languages, with more to follow.

For more on the recommendations, please see the press release as well as a blog post by Peter Suber which provides additional background on the Open Access movement.

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Open Science: Sharing Your Research with the World

About this course

You can become a more visible, effective and impactful researcher by sharing your research data and publications openly. In this course, you will learn the objectives, main concepts, and benefits of Open Source principles along with practices for open data management and open data sharing.

You’ll learn to establish links between publications data and methods, how to attach a persistent identifier and metadata to your results, and methods for clarifying usage rights. You will also discover ways to apply these principles to your daily research and adapt existing routines. Finally, you’ll uncover potential barriers to sharing research and discuss possible solutions.

This course will help you grasp the key principles of Open Science, with answers to questions like:

  • How can researchers effectively store, manage, and share research data?
  • What kinds of open access publishing are most effective?
  • How can researchers increase the visibility and impact of their research?
  • How can the use of social media contribute to the visibility and impact of research?

You will apply the topics of the course to a variety of case studies on Open Science adoption, which you will then discuss among fellow students. You will also be presented with a hands-on guide to publishing your research with open access. This will help you to apply Open Science principles in your daily work. It will enable you to implement and benefit from the Open Science policies that are currently being developed by governments and research institutions.

This course is aimed at professionals. Those who will see the most benefit include academic researchers at different levels: PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, and professors; researchers working for governments; researchers working for commercial enterprises; MSc and BSc students interested to learn about the principles of Open Science.

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ESAC Initiative

ESAC aggregates data and relevant facts for the open access market in general and a number of major publishers in particular in order to illustrate and better assess the development of the scholarly publishing market as it transitions to open access.

ESAC aims to provide context and share information with the broader community on the progress of transitional license models such as “Offsetting” and “Read & Publish,” to increase the understanding of their scope and transformative power. In particular, we collect and share information on the uptake of transformative agreements around world, their transformative mechanisms and cost allocation schemes, the impact achieved in terms of open access, and the relevant workflows.

The ESAC initiative was originally established in 2014 to keep up the discussion around the need to develop workflow efficiencies in the management of open access Article Processing Charges, following an international workshop in 2013 and organized by the Max Planck Digital Library in cooperation with the German Research Foundation (DFG), PLOS and Co-Action Publishing.

In November 2015, ESAC moved under the roof of the DFG funded project INTACT, together with OpenAPC and OAanalytics, with the aim of building infrastructure that would ensure the open access publishing market based on the APC-based business model would remain transparent and sustainable. While the INTACT project officially ended in October 2018, ESAC continues at the Max Planck Digital Library with the collaboration of an international network of partners and supporters.

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