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CategoryBest Practice

Open Scholarship and the Need for Collective Action

The Knowledge Exchange book ‘Open Scholarship and the Need for Collective Action’ aims to build a common understanding of the complex system of scholarly production.

Purpose of the book

As many of the challenges in navigating the transition to Open Scholarship are economic, the focus of the book is on the economic arena. In addition, great attention is given to the incentives, actions and influences of meso-level actors: groups, communities or organisations such as universities, disciplines, scholarly societies or publishers because of their enormous impact on developing open scholarship. The authors analyse how economic models can be applied to scholarship and conclude that economic theory cannot fully explain nor prescribe how Open Scholarship can be achieved. The challenges to achieve Open Scholarship, such as gravitational hubs and the complex governance of common pool resources, are highlighted.

The overall conclusion of the book is that for a successful transition to Open Scholarship, collective action approaches and establishment of a supportive infrastructure are key.

SPARC – Good Practice Principles for Scholarly Communication Services

Science and scholarship are critical to improving our lives and solving the world’s most intractable problems. The communication of research, a vital step in the research process, should be efficient, effective and fulfill the core values of scholarship. There is growing concern about the increasing concentration of control of research communication functions in the hands of a small number of players, whose objectives do not reflect the interests of scholarship. In September 2017, COAR and SPARC published a joint statement related to this issue and pledged to collaborate with others on actions that will ensure research communication services are better aligned with the aims of research.

Accordingly, COAR and SPARC have developed seven good practice principles for scholarly communication services. The aim is to ensure that services are transparent, open, and support the aims of scholarship. These principles can be used by users/clients to make decisions about which services they will contract with, and by service providers to improve their practices and governance. These principles have drawn heavily on other existing principles and, in particular, we gratefully acknowledge the principles developed by Bilder G, Lin J, Neylon C (2015) Principles for Open Scholarly Infrastructure-v1 [retrieved Nov 2018] http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1314859

How-To Guide for Library Publishers: Directory of Open Access Journals Application

About this guide

This how-to guide is a step-by-step guide to the Directory of Open Access journals application, created specifically for library publishers by the 2017-18 Library Publishing Coalition DOAJ Task Force. The task force was charged by the Library Publishing Coalition to evaluate the needs of the LPC community related to the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), mentor LPC member institutions through the DOAJ application process, and recommend any necessary ongoing support. This how-to guide is the major written resource we have created for member institutions.

Deciding where to submit

Did you know that there are more than 25,000 biomedical journals?

The number of scientific journals continues to increase rapidly1. Given this situation, it is perhaps not surprising to learn that many authors have a difficult time deciding where to submit their manuscript for publication. There are many factors that may play a role in your decision of where to submit your manuscript.

Good Practice Principles for Scholarly Communication Services (by COAR and SPARC)

Jane Biosemantics

Have you recently written a paper, but you’re not sure to which journal you should submit it? Or maybe you want to find relevant articles to cite in your paper? Or are you an editor, and do you need to find reviewers for a particular paper? Jane can help!

Just enter the title and/or abstract of the paper in the box, and click on ‘Find journals’, ‘Find authors’ or ‘Find Articles’. Jane will then compare your document to millions of documents in PubMed to find the best matching journals, authors or articles.

Keyword search

Instead of using a title or abstract, you can also search using a keyword search, similar to popular web search engines. Click here to search using keywords.

Beware of predatory journals

JANE relies on the data in PubMed, which can contain papers from predatory journals, and therefore these journals can appear in JANE’s results. To help identify high-quality journals, JANE now tags journals that are currently indexed in MEDLINE, and open access journals approved by the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).

FOSTER Open Science toolkit

FOSTER Plus developed a set of ten free online courses covering key topics of Open Science. Each course takes about one hour to complete and a badge is awarded after successful completion. You will need to create a free account on the FOSTER portal if you wish to claim your badge but the courses can also be accessed without registration if no badge is desired. The order you take the courses in is not important, the system tracks your progress regardless and you can claim the badge as soon you completed each of the suggested courses. However, we recommend starting with “What is Open Science?” as an introduction. The draft courses were released for public consultation during the summer and have been refined based on community feedback.

Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access

Schimmer, R., Geschuhn, K. K., & Vogler, A. (2015). Disrupting the subscription journals’ business model for the necessary large-scale transformation to open access. doi:10.17617/1.3.

This paper makes the strong, fact-based case for a large-scale transformation of the current corpus of scientific subscription journals to an open access business model. The existing journals, with their well-tested functionalities, should be retained and developed to meet the demands of 21st century research, while the underlying payment streams undergo a major restructuring. There is sufficient momentum for this decisive push towards open access publishing. The diverse existing initiatives must be coordinated so as to converge on this clear goal. The international nature of research implies that this transformation will be achieved on a truly global scale only through a consensus of the world’s most eminent research organizations. All the indications are that the money already invested in the research publishing system is sufficient to enable a transformation that will be sustainable for the future. There needs to be a shared understanding that the money currently locked in the journal subscription system must be withdrawn and re-purposed for open access publishing services. The current library acquisition budgets are the ultimate reservoir for enabling the transformation without financial or other risks. The goal is to preserve the established service levels provided by publishers that are still requested by researchers, while redefining and reorganizing the necessary payment streams. By disrupting the underlying business model, the viability of journal publishing can be preserved and put on a solid footing for the scholarly developments of the future.

Open Access Journal Publishing Resource Index

A variety of resources are available to guide the launch and operation of an open-access journal. To promote awareness of these resources, and to facilitate their efficient use, this section provides a high-level index to these guides by topic. Also included are links to example documents for key planning elements, such as new journal prospectuses, bylaws, sample editorial policies, and others.